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Doctoral Consortium | CHI 2013
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Doctoral Consortium

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  • DVMMath Manipulation for Students with Impaired Vision
    N. Alajarmeh (New Mexico State Univ. (NMSU), USA)
    N. Alajarmeh (New Mexico State Univ. (NMSU), USA)

    Motivate researchers interested in exploring more areas in math accessibility that will eventually benefit students who have visual disability in their education and career.As support for mathematics accessibility has, historically, been limited, it has served as a barrier for students with impaired vision in learning that fundamental subject. In response to that need, my focus on enhancing mathematics accessibility has emphasized the practice of providing more attention in facilitating “Doing the math” and not just working on the rendering level. My efforts are particularly focused on enabling students with visual disabilities to confront the challenges they face in algebra, and to learn and utilize algebraic skills; i.e., manipulation on the level of basic building blocks of entire expressions, working on complex expressions simplifications and evaluation, and solving algebraic equations.

  • DSMNurturing Children’s Creative Practice through Micro-Enactments
    S. Chu Yew Yee (Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State Univ., USA)
    S. Chu Yew Yee (Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State Univ., USA)

    We explore how technology may motivate children to engage creativity throughout the Fourth-grade Slump in the domain of storytelling. We propose an approach based on the concept of micro-enactments.At the age of eight to nine when social awareness and self-evaluation increase, a child sees a precipitous drop in creative activity. This phenomenon known as the ‘Fourth-Grade Slump’ has been shown across cultures. We posit that it is ultimately a motivational problem. This dissertation research explores the potential that technology-based media may have to motivate a child to engage in creative activity throughout the Slump. It investigates affordances of technology for creation in the domain of storytelling, and proposes an approach based on the concept of micro-enactments.

  • DCZMulti-Player Online Video Games for Cognitive Rehabilitation
    J. Colman (Univ. of Portsmouth, UK)
    J. Colman (Univ. of Portsmouth, UK)

    The expected contribution of this research is to open up the possibility of a new, complimentary form of therapy for some of those people who survive brain injury.This document describes the author’s PhD work done to date. The motivation and background is described, and the hypothesis presented, which is that an online multi-player video game could provide cognitive therapy for brain-injured people. The proposed experiment is described, explaining the design decisions made. The expected contribution of this research is stated.

  • DQZSYSSON: A Systematic Procedure to Develop Sonifications
    V. Goudarzi (Institute of Electronic Music and Acoustics, AT)
    V. Goudarzi (Institute of Electronic Music and Acoustics, AT)

    A ‘User-Centered Design’ approach to sonification is explored. Creating an audio interface to enrich climate scientists analytical tasks is the goal.The goal of this thesis is to design, develop and evaluate a ‘User-Centered Design’ approach to sonification. Eighteen climate scientists volunteered for requirements-gathering interviews. The results showed that climate scientists are heavily depending on visual display in their data analysis workflows. An audio interface shall enrich their perceptualization possibilities, based on the language metaphors derived from the interviews.

  • DMZInfluencing the User Experience through Unexpected Events
    A. Gross (Technische Univ. Berlin, DE)
    A. Gross (Technische Univ. Berlin, DE)

    Describes the content and time plan of a PhD project that aims to develop guidelines for developers and designers on how to deal with surprising characteristics of digital products.This extended abstract contains a detailed description of my PhD research project. I am focusing on the effects of surprising behavior of digital products on objective and subjective emotion measures as well as subjective User Experience (UX) ratings. My research context, motivation, research goals, and dissertation status will be presented, as well as the work I have already done.

  • DBMSupporting Behavioral Differences and Changes in Personal Task Management
    M. Haraty (Univ. of British Columbia, CA)
    M. Haraty (Univ. of British Columbia, CA)

    The contributions of this thesis are: characterization of behavioral differences and changes in personal task management, design and evaluation of personalization facilities for accommodating behavioral differences and changes in PTM.Research on personalization has mostly focused on improving low-level aspect of user’s performance (e.g. time to access a command) or automating tasks for accommodating the different needs of individuals. Thus, the results of that research has often led to the design of personalization facilities that allow users to accomplish their goals faster. While this is a valuable outcome, personalization research has given little attention to supporting individual differences beyond those related to user’s performance. For my PhD research, I explore 1) behavioral differences in the context of personal task management, and 2) the design of personalization facilities that can accommodate such differences.

  • DLMMaterializing Trust as an Understandable Digital Concept
    C. Hochleitner (Univ. of Salzburg, AT)
    C. Hochleitner (Univ. of Salzburg, AT)

    It is the goal of this PhD to re-use familiar concepts from interaction design, as well as known materials to provide understandable and intuitive trustworthiness feedback in new technological environments.Trust is a very complex concept in digital environments. While trust is understandable by users in an inter-personal context, the transfer of this concept to a digital world holds many problems. As a result, the provision of feedback on a system’s trustworthiness, particularly in connection with new technologies, such as the Internet of Things or ubiquitous and wearable computing, holds many obstacles. Therefore it is the goal of this PhD to re-use familiar concepts from interaction design, as well as known materials to provide understandable and intuitive trustworthiness feedback in new technological environments.

  • DFZDigital Arts for End-users: Learning from Traditional Craft Practice
    R. Kazi (National Univ. of Singapore, SG)
    R. Kazi (National Univ. of Singapore, SG)

    Describes the design of digital art tools with playful experience that reaches a wider range of audience. The design combines many of the benefits of traditional craft practice with computation.Traditional physical art mediums can be a great source of design insights for end-user digital media authoring tools. My PhD work exemplifies how an in-depth understanding of real-life workflow and artifacts aids the design and development of SandCanvas (a digital art medium for sand animation) and Vignette (a style preserving sketching tool for pen-and-ink illustration).

  • DHMDevelopment of a Taxonomy to Improve Human-Robot-Interaction Through Multimodal Robot Feedback
    N. Mirnig (ICT&S Center, Univ. of Salzburg, AT)
    N. Mirnig (ICT&S Center, Univ. of Salzburg, AT)

    The robot feedback taxonomy will assist researchers in identifying areas that still need to be explored, the guidelines are aimed at supporting robot designers to equip robots with meaningful feedback.The adequacy of a robot’s feedback is crucial for advan-ced human-robot interaction (HRI). We investigate how multimodality can add value for better cooperation in a future in which robots will co-exist with us. There is a lot of research around service robots and many scena-rios are being worked on: Robots that help us, cooper-ate with us, or even ones that eventually need our assistance. For smooth interaction it is necessary for humans to understand the robot, which is why I pro-pose a taxonomy of robot feedback. The taxonomy, which is mapped out in an iterative process, is aimed at providing a deeper understanding of feedback in general and to improve the specific area of HRI.

  • DZMBlackgammon: A Grounded Participatory Design of a Preconception Health Promotion ‘Alternate Reality Game’ for Adolescent Indigenous Australian Women
    M. Muscat (James Cook Univ., AU)
    M. Muscat (James Cook Univ., AU)

    Develop and describe innovative participatory design processes using an alternative reality game design framework for health promotion in high-risk populations. I first discovered Alternate Reality Gaming (ARG) after reading Jane McGonigal’s “Reality is Broken: Why games make us better and how they can change the world” and I was intrigued. Leveraging social networking tools and mobile devices, ARG promote collaborative gameplay, which encourages players to participate in problem solving and the co-creation of knowledge, which can be applied in the context of real world issues. This suggests there is opportunity for the players to be empowered through this process. This motivated me to think how ARG could be used to engage the participation of adolescent Indigenous Australians and empower them to address some of their most challenging health issues. This study investigates the participatory design and play of an ARG to engage adolescent Indigenous Australians, to empower them to participate in preconception health promotion for the improvement maternal and infant health outcomes in their communities.

  • DJZUsing Robot-Mediated Communication to Improve Remote Collaboration
    I. Rae (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, USA)
    I. Rae (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, USA)

    Presents a summary of the results from three studies on the effects of physical embodiment and control on collaboration using robot-mediated communication and proposes two future studies.An emerging technology for supporting geographically distributed work teams, robot-mediated communication (RMC) presents new opportunities for supporting effective collaboration. These systems extend videoconferencing capabilities by providing local users with a physical embodiment of the remote user to interact with. They also give the operator control over the system via the ability to navigate and to manipulate the system’s cameras within the local user’s environment. The goal of my dissertation is to investigate how these key functionalities—physical embodiment and control over the system—affect collaborative outcomes and to use the results to develop heuristics that inform both the design of future RMC systems and aid in understanding how these characteristics might affect similar technologies. In addition, my dissertation aims at contributing to our theoretical understanding of collaboration and the part that these functionalities or affordances play in it. This research focuses on three phases of investigation: (1) how the addition of these functionalities shapes user relationships, (2) how changes to the physical embodiment of the system affect the local user’s perceptions of the remote user, and (3) how variations in perceived control of the system alter interactions between users.

  • DTZDesign and Evaluation of Proxemics-Aware Environments to Support Navigation in Large Information Spaces
    R. Rädle (Univ., DE)
    R. Rädle (Univ., DE)

    I will provide first results on how coarse body movements used for navigation tasks effect spatial memory of users.In my research, I explore the use of proxemics in Human-Computer Interaction to design explicit and implicit interaction with knowledge work environments for literature review, reading & writing, or discussion. This paper proposes the employment of proxemics for different tasks in knowledge work such as navigation in large information spaces (e.g. zooming and panning). To evaluate different designs, I created a physical environment with interactive walls and multi-touch tables alongside displays of various sizes to form a multi-display environment that enables measuring proxemic relationships (e.g. for manipulating a digital viewport according to a user’s location and orientation in physical space). The aim of my dissertation is to design and evaluate different navigation concepts for large information spaces that employ Proxemic Interactions.

  • DEMExploiting Spatial Memory to Design Efficient Command Interfaces
    J. Scarr (Univ. of Canterbury, NZ)
    J. Scarr (Univ. of Canterbury, NZ)

    Studies the development, robustness and efficiency of spatial memory-based item retrieval. Presents new interfaces that exploit spatial memory to enable rapid command selection, while supporting spatial learning for novices.A common goal for user interface designers is to design efficient UIs that facilitate high levels of performance. In point-and-click interfaces, spatial memory has been shown to play an important role in reaching this level of performance, since it allows users to make quick decisions about item locations rather than resorting to slow visual search. However, spatial memory is rarely exploited by modern applications. Hierarchical menus force users through laborious action sequences to access commands, while window content is frequently elided and reshuffled in response to changing window geometries. In order to inform the design of UIs that better support spatial memory, we are studying the human and interface factors that affect the growth and resilience of spatial knowledge, and producing a series of exemplar interfaces that exploit users’ spatial memory to rapidly achieve high levels of performance. A new command selection technique called CommandMaps demonstrates that when users have spatial memory of an interface, target acquisition can be vastly improved by removing control hierarchies. StencilMaps builds on the CommandMap technique, highlighting salient commands to accelerate novice visual search. Our ongoing research investigates the robustness of spatial memory and the role of ‘effortful’ learning in the development of spatial automaticity.

  • DPMInferential Methods in Interaction, Usability and User Experience
    H. Vrzakova (Univ. of Eastern Finland, FI)
    H. Vrzakova (Univ. of Eastern Finland, FI)

    Visual attention and aspect of user experience resonate with each other. I will introduce their links, as seen through eye-tracking and computational methods, and open discussion on establishing valid measurements.Usability and user experience are hard to observe, measure and evaluate. However, current state-of-art in eye-tracking observes human gaze under various conditions and hence, is a powerful source for visual attention analysis. My research focuses on human cognitive states, underpinning usability and user experience, and their link to eye movements.

  • DXZAutomation of VUI to GUI Mapping
    A. Wagner (Univ. of Alabama, USA)
    A. Wagner (Univ. of Alabama, USA)

    This research aims to improve the manner in which users with motor impairments interact with a computer by utilizing voice. This document presents a brief overview of my doctoral research, which is focused on an approach to map a VUI to a GUI in order to increase the usability of graphical applications for users with motoric challenges. This is accomplished by creating a prototype that uses voice as an input modality for Scratch. Evaluation and assessment of the research will be performed through observation of children with motor disabilities using the tool. The research will be further generalized by creating a template for mapping a VUI to any GUI. My current research focus is summarized followed by the motivation for this research. Related work is described along with a problem statement and research goals. My dissertation status and expected contributions conclude this document.